Labour win European count in Warrington - but UKIP close second

Warrington Guardian: Labour win Eurooean count in Warrington - but UKIP close second Labour win Eurooean count in Warrington - but UKIP close second

LABOUR topped the poll for the European Elections in Warrington.

But the party polled just 1,001 more votes than a buoyant UKIP.

The Conservatives were third while the Liberal Democrats were a distant fourth, ahead of the Greens.

It was a similar result across the north west, with Labour edging UKIP.

Both parties will have three MEPs and the Tories two.

Long standing Lib Dem MEP Chris Davies lost his seat. BNP leader Nick Griffin was also booted out.

The count was held on Sunday to tie in with Europe after the local election results on Friday.

The turnout was 32.64 per cent.

Despite topping the poll, it was as worrying a night for Labour as it was the Conservatives with a General Election just one year away.

An insider told the Warrington Guardian there was concern within the Labour party locally about the number of UKIP votes in the inner wards of the town where the party would usually dominate.

The results in full in Warrington:

Labour   16237

Ukip   15236

Conservatives   10782

Liberal Democrats   3898

Green Party   2875

An Independence from Europe   735

BNP   685

English democrats   628

Pirate Party   369

No2EU   121

Socialist Equity Party 111

 

 

 

Comments (12)

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2:43pm Mon 26 May 14

*Spartan* says...

Well done UKIP. Hopefully next year you can over take Labour. Time for a new era in politics in the North West.
Well done UKIP. Hopefully next year you can over take Labour. Time for a new era in politics in the North West. *Spartan*
  • Score: 11

10:42pm Mon 26 May 14

Brick Bazooka says...

*Spartan* wrote:
Well done UKIP. Hopefully next year you can over take Labour. Time for a new era in politics in the North West.
I'll echo that. Don't really want Labour getting back in power, spending all the money the Conservatives have recovered since their last Balls up.
[quote][p][bold]*Spartan*[/bold] wrote: Well done UKIP. Hopefully next year you can over take Labour. Time for a new era in politics in the North West.[/p][/quote]I'll echo that. Don't really want Labour getting back in power, spending all the money the Conservatives have recovered since their last Balls up. Brick Bazooka
  • Score: 6

8:11am Tue 27 May 14

Simon27476 says...

Brick Bazooka wrote:
*Spartan* wrote:
Well done UKIP. Hopefully next year you can over take Labour. Time for a new era in politics in the North West.
I'll echo that. Don't really want Labour getting back in power, spending all the money the Conservatives have recovered since their last Balls up.
Nice pun. If Labour get in, it'll be an Ed Balls up!!!
[quote][p][bold]Brick Bazooka[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]*Spartan*[/bold] wrote: Well done UKIP. Hopefully next year you can over take Labour. Time for a new era in politics in the North West.[/p][/quote]I'll echo that. Don't really want Labour getting back in power, spending all the money the Conservatives have recovered since their last Balls up.[/p][/quote]Nice pun. If Labour get in, it'll be an Ed Balls up!!! Simon27476
  • Score: 5

8:15am Tue 27 May 14

PageA says...

Well they do say things always come around again...and here come the 1950s! Just for the people who are confused and frightened by the big bad world outside. A new era where Europe is dominated by it's own far right party of chauvinistic nut jobs using an economic crisis and a natural fear of the 'other' to leverage support from 'normal' people. We are lucky to live in the longest period of peace in Europe. I have never had to go overseas to fight and neither did my father. But these are stupid times..and history shows us that in stupid times come stupid leaders and stupid followers. I hope you stupid people haven't started a chain reaction that results in my grandchildren fighting on foreign soil. The more I think about it the more the Logan's run idea seems appealing. Let the kids have a go.
Well they do say things always come around again...and here come the 1950s! Just for the people who are confused and frightened by the big bad world outside. A new era where Europe is dominated by it's own far right party of chauvinistic nut jobs using an economic crisis and a natural fear of the 'other' to leverage support from 'normal' people. We are lucky to live in the longest period of peace in Europe. I have never had to go overseas to fight and neither did my father. But these are stupid times..and history shows us that in stupid times come stupid leaders and stupid followers. I hope you stupid people haven't started a chain reaction that results in my grandchildren fighting on foreign soil. The more I think about it the more the Logan's run idea seems appealing. Let the kids have a go. PageA
  • Score: 3

9:58am Tue 27 May 14

SickAndTired2 says...

Anyone who seriously believes UKIP is the answer to this countries political issues is politically illiterate.
Anyone who seriously believes UKIP is the answer to this countries political issues is politically illiterate. SickAndTired2
  • Score: -2

10:32am Tue 27 May 14

ninearches says...

Cameron could solve a lot of the UKIP threat to his & every other main party's vote by staging a referendum either before the next election or at least alongside it. Too many people in Britain don't like the way Britain & its governance have been swallowed up by what was sold to the public as a trading alliance & not a political leviathon.
Cameron could solve a lot of the UKIP threat to his & every other main party's vote by staging a referendum either before the next election or at least alongside it. Too many people in Britain don't like the way Britain & its governance have been swallowed up by what was sold to the public as a trading alliance & not a political leviathon. ninearches
  • Score: 12

11:16am Tue 27 May 14

Karlar says...

The EU started off with subsidiarity as one of its central planks for membership, but once the political federalists got their teeth into it things went awry. The original concept of the EU were and remain laudable. However, what has happened was inevitable when politicians, many with little or no experience of the world other than closeted political committee rooms, started to make ill informed decisions and started to bend their own rules to enlarge the EU. The organisation needs to be drastically reorganised to bring it back on track politically and financially. How many years now have the EU Audit Commission refused to sign off the EU budget?
The EU started off with subsidiarity as one of its central planks for membership, but once the political federalists got their teeth into it things went awry. The original concept of the EU were and remain laudable. However, what has happened was inevitable when politicians, many with little or no experience of the world other than closeted political committee rooms, started to make ill informed decisions and started to bend their own rules to enlarge the EU. The organisation needs to be drastically reorganised to bring it back on track politically and financially. How many years now have the EU Audit Commission refused to sign off the EU budget? Karlar
  • Score: 8

11:34am Tue 27 May 14

PageA says...

I think we should embrace this and get thoroughly stuck in with our European brothers and sisters. It's a real opportunity to move humanity forward, sharing resources and skills for the benefit of all. I'm quite comfortable with a foreign manager leading the English team out at the world cup, having my major corporations and utility companies owned by foreign investment companies and driving German cars and like I've said before Angela Merkel would put a few things right in our ecomomy. Things have changed and things will change again...Boris cometh
I think we should embrace this and get thoroughly stuck in with our European brothers and sisters. It's a real opportunity to move humanity forward, sharing resources and skills for the benefit of all. I'm quite comfortable with a foreign manager leading the English team out at the world cup, having my major corporations and utility companies owned by foreign investment companies and driving German cars and like I've said before Angela Merkel would put a few things right in our ecomomy. Things have changed and things will change again...Boris cometh PageA
  • Score: -1

3:38pm Tue 27 May 14

PageA says...

Not an easy interview for Farage but an interesting watch if you have a minute..

http://www.huffingto
npost.co.uk/2014/05/
16/nigel-farage-ukip
-lbc-interview-video
_n_5336322.html
Not an easy interview for Farage but an interesting watch if you have a minute.. http://www.huffingto npost.co.uk/2014/05/ 16/nigel-farage-ukip -lbc-interview-video _n_5336322.html PageA
  • Score: -5

9:13pm Tue 27 May 14

Rowdie says...

Karlar wrote:
The EU started off with subsidiarity as one of its central planks for membership, but once the political federalists got their teeth into it things went awry. The original concept of the EU were and remain laudable. However, what has happened was inevitable when politicians, many with little or no experience of the world other than closeted political committee rooms, started to make ill informed decisions and started to bend their own rules to enlarge the EU. The organisation needs to be drastically reorganised to bring it back on track politically and financially. How many years now have the EU Audit Commission refused to sign off the EU budget?
Do you think Cameron can make any in-roads?
[quote][p][bold]Karlar[/bold] wrote: The EU started off with subsidiarity as one of its central planks for membership, but once the political federalists got their teeth into it things went awry. The original concept of the EU were and remain laudable. However, what has happened was inevitable when politicians, many with little or no experience of the world other than closeted political committee rooms, started to make ill informed decisions and started to bend their own rules to enlarge the EU. The organisation needs to be drastically reorganised to bring it back on track politically and financially. How many years now have the EU Audit Commission refused to sign off the EU budget?[/p][/quote]Do you think Cameron can make any in-roads? Rowdie
  • Score: -1

10:46pm Tue 27 May 14

Karlar says...

Rowdie wrote:
Karlar wrote:
The EU started off with subsidiarity as one of its central planks for membership, but once the political federalists got their teeth into it things went awry. The original concept of the EU were and remain laudable. However, what has happened was inevitable when politicians, many with little or no experience of the world other than closeted political committee rooms, started to make ill informed decisions and started to bend their own rules to enlarge the EU. The organisation needs to be drastically reorganised to bring it back on track politically and financially. How many years now have the EU Audit Commission refused to sign off the EU budget?
Do you think Cameron can make any in-roads?
No I don't in the short term because there is too much to put right in the EU, financial discipline, the CAP and subsidiarity to name but three. Regardless of the recent election results the federalists still hold sway and they will take some shifting. They were the ones who went hell for leather for enlargement regardless of the financial status of those they were inviting to the party, and in so doing ignored the basic and sensible rule of first achieving virtual parity between currencies before allowing them in. What has happened was inevitable when political imperatives took precedence over sensible financial ones. As it is run at present the EU leaks money in a big way.
[quote][p][bold]Rowdie[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Karlar[/bold] wrote: The EU started off with subsidiarity as one of its central planks for membership, but once the political federalists got their teeth into it things went awry. The original concept of the EU were and remain laudable. However, what has happened was inevitable when politicians, many with little or no experience of the world other than closeted political committee rooms, started to make ill informed decisions and started to bend their own rules to enlarge the EU. The organisation needs to be drastically reorganised to bring it back on track politically and financially. How many years now have the EU Audit Commission refused to sign off the EU budget?[/p][/quote]Do you think Cameron can make any in-roads?[/p][/quote]No I don't in the short term because there is too much to put right in the EU, financial discipline, the CAP and subsidiarity to name but three. Regardless of the recent election results the federalists still hold sway and they will take some shifting. They were the ones who went hell for leather for enlargement regardless of the financial status of those they were inviting to the party, and in so doing ignored the basic and sensible rule of first achieving virtual parity between currencies before allowing them in. What has happened was inevitable when political imperatives took precedence over sensible financial ones. As it is run at present the EU leaks money in a big way. Karlar
  • Score: 1

12:49pm Wed 28 May 14

Karlar says...

Here's a quote from today's Telegraph which shows a little more of the EU's inherent problems and what David Cameron and others are up against if they are serious about effecting meaningful change:

" Britain could still be outvoted next month over the appointment of Mr Juncker because France, Spain and others back him for the post in support of the European Parliament.
Until he resigned amid a spying scandal last December, Mr Juncker, 59, was the last European leader who believes that the EU should be transformed into a federal United States of Europe.
He was also the chairman of meetings of Eurozone finance ministers throughout the height of the European debt crisis during which time he admitted he "had to lie" and that sensitive economic policy decisions had to be taken in "secret, dark debates".
Here's a quote from today's Telegraph which shows a little more of the EU's inherent problems and what David Cameron and others are up against if they are serious about effecting meaningful change: " Britain could still be outvoted next month over the appointment of Mr Juncker because France, Spain and others back him for the post in support of the European Parliament. Until he resigned amid a spying scandal last December, Mr Juncker, 59, was the last European leader who believes that the EU should be transformed into a federal United States of Europe. He was also the chairman of meetings of Eurozone finance ministers throughout the height of the European debt crisis during which time he admitted he "had to lie" and that sensitive economic policy decisions had to be taken in "secret, dark debates". Karlar
  • Score: 3

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