Think GCSEs in Warrington are easy? Take our test and see how much you know!

Think GCSEs in Warrington are easy? Take our test and see how much you know!

Think GCSEs in Warrington are easy? Take our test and see how much you know!

First published in News

WITH the exam season coming to an end, why not put your brain power to the test to see if you are smarter than a 16-year-old?

Last year, 1,828 pupils achieved an A* to C grade in GCSE English in the town, 1,846 in GCSE maths and 1,631 in GCSE science and engineering.

But do you have what it takes to pass those all important exams and correctly answer past GCSE questions by examining board AQA?

Some people believe GCSEs are far easier in comparison to their O-Level counterparts and have become less challenging over time.

But Cardinal Newman High School head teacher Julie Warburton disagreed that this was the case and said it was insulting that people have reached this conclusion.

She said: “How can someone pass a judgement when they have not experienced both? Teaching and learning has raised standards and continues to do so.”

Assistant negotiating secretary Warrington NASUWT Kate Morgan added: “Students and teachers alike are tired and demoralised by the constant vilification by the media and the government, at a time when the pressure and the stakes have never been so high.”

Pupils have a long wait before they discover if their hard work has paid off and must now wait patiently for results day on August 21.

Year 11 pupil Beth Robertson, who has just sat her final exam at Cardinal Newman, said: “I recognised it would be hard and thought I was prepared for it but the reality of managing my time and meeting the demands of each exam was really difficult. I just hope it has all been worth it.”

Ailish Draper added: “The demands and challenges were far more than I ever anticipated, with the benefit of hindsight, I wish I had started revising in year seven.”

MATHS 

1. Sophie sells birthday cards. She adds 30 per cent profit to the cost price. She sells the cards for £2.34 each. She wants to increase her profit to 40 per cent of the cost price. How much should she sell each card for?

2. Simplify x + 8x − 3x

STATISTICS

At the beginning of 2012 the town of Brigg had a population of 6000.
In 2012 there were 63 births in the town. Calculate the crude birth rate for Brigg in 2012.

BIOLOGY

One factor that may affect body mass is metabolic rate. What is meant by metabolic rate?

CHEMISTRY

Crude oil is a mixture of many different chemical compounds. Fuels, such as petrol (gasoline), can be produced from crude oil. Fuels react with oxygen to release energy. Name the type of reaction that releases energy from a fuel.

PHYSICS

In the UK, over 70 per cent of the electricity is generated in power stations that burn fossil fuels. Explain one effect that burning fossil fuels has on the environment.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE

‘Homework has no value. Some students get it done for them; some don’t do it at all. Students should be relaxing in their free time.’ Write an article for a broadsheet newspaper in which you explain your point of view on this statement.

GEOGRAPHY

Contrast the positions of granite and chalk on the geological time scale.

HISTORY

Choose one of the factors below which have influenced the prevention and cure of disease and infection:

• religion
• chance

Describe the influence of your chosen factor on the prevention and cure of
disease and infection.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

Give one reason why we use binary to represent data in computers. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

How is maximum heart rate calculated?

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION

Explain briefly why some Christians call the Holy Communion service ‘the Eucharist’.

PSYCHOLOGY

Changing information so that it can be stored in the memory system is known as retrieval. True or false?

For the answers, click here.

Comments (9)

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2:27pm Fri 27 Jun 14

MikeJT says...

Two month until the WG jump on the media bandwagon and criticise this years pupils for being "the first year group in 20 years where standards have fallen", and completely ignore that its due in a large part top reverting back to a single exam basis of assessment. I have a 16 year old who has just sat her exams and (OK, Im biased) who studied really hard for them. There are a few of them that she is not sure about because of either a) she didnt understand some of the wording (dyslexic but apparently not enough to get extra help), b) she was well (hayfever !!!!!) or c) there were questions on stuff which they never even covered in school (apparently there is actually no requirement on school to cover the syllabus !! All we have told her is that as long as she does her best we are proud of her. But will this be another group of youngsters let down by the system or also unfairly criticised by the media (they like doing that!)
Two month until the WG jump on the media bandwagon and criticise this years pupils for being "the first year group in 20 years where standards have fallen", and completely ignore that its due in a large part top reverting back to a single exam basis of assessment. I have a 16 year old who has just sat her exams and (OK, Im biased) who studied really hard for them. There are a few of them that she is not sure about because of either a) she didnt understand some of the wording (dyslexic but apparently not enough to get extra help), b) she was well (hayfever !!!!!) or c) there were questions on stuff which they never even covered in school (apparently there is actually no requirement on school to cover the syllabus !! All we have told her is that as long as she does her best we are proud of her. But will this be another group of youngsters let down by the system or also unfairly criticised by the media (they like doing that!) MikeJT
  • Score: 0

11:15pm Fri 27 Jun 14

realistic southstander says...

Getting the excuses in early then!
Getting the excuses in early then! realistic southstander
  • Score: 0

8:34am Sat 28 Jun 14

silverlady54 says...

I agree with MikeJT. I know of one A level student who has worked extremely hard but told me this week that some of the compulsory questions had not been covered by the teacher in class. There is little hope for our youngsters until the system and the teachers are able to competently deliver the required information. They should also be taught to think for themselves and research around the subject, something which clearly does not happen in state schools at present.
I agree with MikeJT. I know of one A level student who has worked extremely hard but told me this week that some of the compulsory questions had not been covered by the teacher in class. There is little hope for our youngsters until the system and the teachers are able to competently deliver the required information. They should also be taught to think for themselves and research around the subject, something which clearly does not happen in state schools at present. silverlady54
  • Score: 3

9:00pm Sat 28 Jun 14

ry4nw1 says...

i would take the tests to prove they are easy, who would i contact to do this?
i would take the tests to prove they are easy, who would i contact to do this? ry4nw1
  • Score: -4

11:31am Sun 29 Jun 14

realistic southstander says...

In the vast majority of cases if you can't pass ( grades A*-C) today's GCSEs then you will struggle throughout your life in society.
In the vast majority of cases if you can't pass ( grades A*-C) today's GCSEs then you will struggle throughout your life in society. realistic southstander
  • Score: 2

4:39am Mon 30 Jun 14

richiepooh says...

I came into this believing the media hype that the questions were harder. Not the public opinion that they were easier after all what access does the public have to the questions.
Upon reading those questions I would say and I honestly am disappointed I have been wrong for many years. These are the kind of questions I remember from my 11+ not O'levels. Shockingly easy.
No wonder kids are seemingly dumber.
I came into this believing the media hype that the questions were harder. Not the public opinion that they were easier after all what access does the public have to the questions. Upon reading those questions I would say and I honestly am disappointed I have been wrong for many years. These are the kind of questions I remember from my 11+ not O'levels. Shockingly easy. No wonder kids are seemingly dumber. richiepooh
  • Score: 3

8:33am Mon 30 Jun 14

silverlady54 says...

richiepooh wrote:
I came into this believing the media hype that the questions were harder. Not the public opinion that they were easier after all what access does the public have to the questions.
Upon reading those questions I would say and I honestly am disappointed I have been wrong for many years. These are the kind of questions I remember from my 11+ not O'levels. Shockingly easy.
No wonder kids are seemingly dumber.
Precisely, and until the system changes so that teachers who really know their subject are able to teach effectively, the young will continue to struggle. They are not stupid, they deserve the kind of teachers who taught us, expected a lot from us and managed to instil a broad general knowledge. You can instantly see this in shows like 'The Chase' and other similar game shows where there is a distinct division on age grounds between those who know a wide range of facts relating to history, geography etc. and those who have 'no idea'.
[quote][p][bold]richiepooh[/bold] wrote: I came into this believing the media hype that the questions were harder. Not the public opinion that they were easier after all what access does the public have to the questions. Upon reading those questions I would say and I honestly am disappointed I have been wrong for many years. These are the kind of questions I remember from my 11+ not O'levels. Shockingly easy. No wonder kids are seemingly dumber.[/p][/quote]Precisely, and until the system changes so that teachers who really know their subject are able to teach effectively, the young will continue to struggle. They are not stupid, they deserve the kind of teachers who taught us, expected a lot from us and managed to instil a broad general knowledge. You can instantly see this in shows like 'The Chase' and other similar game shows where there is a distinct division on age grounds between those who know a wide range of facts relating to history, geography etc. and those who have 'no idea'. silverlady54
  • Score: 5

10:53pm Mon 30 Jun 14

local man says...

silverlady54 wrote:
richiepooh wrote:
I came into this believing the media hype that the questions were harder. Not the public opinion that they were easier after all what access does the public have to the questions.
Upon reading those questions I would say and I honestly am disappointed I have been wrong for many years. These are the kind of questions I remember from my 11+ not O'levels. Shockingly easy.
No wonder kids are seemingly dumber.
Precisely, and until the system changes so that teachers who really know their subject are able to teach effectively, the young will continue to struggle. They are not stupid, they deserve the kind of teachers who taught us, expected a lot from us and managed to instil a broad general knowledge. You can instantly see this in shows like 'The Chase' and other similar game shows where there is a distinct division on age grounds between those who know a wide range of facts relating to history, geography etc. and those who have 'no idea'.
although questions about sport, reality tv and music dont tax them, anything about politics, news, world events, history, science ...
[quote][p][bold]silverlady54[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]richiepooh[/bold] wrote: I came into this believing the media hype that the questions were harder. Not the public opinion that they were easier after all what access does the public have to the questions. Upon reading those questions I would say and I honestly am disappointed I have been wrong for many years. These are the kind of questions I remember from my 11+ not O'levels. Shockingly easy. No wonder kids are seemingly dumber.[/p][/quote]Precisely, and until the system changes so that teachers who really know their subject are able to teach effectively, the young will continue to struggle. They are not stupid, they deserve the kind of teachers who taught us, expected a lot from us and managed to instil a broad general knowledge. You can instantly see this in shows like 'The Chase' and other similar game shows where there is a distinct division on age grounds between those who know a wide range of facts relating to history, geography etc. and those who have 'no idea'.[/p][/quote]although questions about sport, reality tv and music dont tax them, anything about politics, news, world events, history, science ... local man
  • Score: 0

5:37am Tue 1 Jul 14

MikeJT says...

BUT, the system also fails the bright kids. How many of those "record grade As" were due to easy exams and how can you spot the bright kids who would have excelled doing "old style" papers.

As regards shaking up the overall system. I wonder why none of the experts have thought about using a test as the benchmark BUT testing at set periods during the two years rather than all based on 1 exam at the end.
BUT, the system also fails the bright kids. How many of those "record grade As" were due to easy exams and how can you spot the bright kids who would have excelled doing "old style" papers. As regards shaking up the overall system. I wonder why none of the experts have thought about using a test as the benchmark BUT testing at set periods during the two years rather than all based on 1 exam at the end. MikeJT
  • Score: 0

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