Eight high school heads in Warrington earn more than £600k between them

Warrington Guardian: Eight high school heads in Warrington earn more than £600k between them Eight high school heads in Warrington earn more than £600k between them

THE annual bill for eight of the town’s secondary school principals costs the tax payer more than half a million pounds, the Warrington Guardian has learned.

But the exact figure is expected to be even higher as the information does not include the salaries for head teachers at all academy schools, which have more freedom over pay than conventional local authority schools.

Figures released by the council reveal that eight head teachers earn between £620,000 and £659,992 collectively.

One head teacher takes home between £100,000 and £104,999 - earning more than a qualified nurse, a firefighter and police constable combined.

The lowest paid head teacher at a high school in Warrington earns between £55,000 and £55,999.

The bill for 64 primary school head teachers each year is between £3,490,000 and £3,809,936 with seven primary heads in Warrington earning the highest salary of between £65,999 and £69,999.

Published data follows recent calls from teaching unions to publish the exact salaries of teachers.

National executive member for the NASUWT for Merseyside and Cheshire, Mick Burrows, argued that head teachers’ pay should not be kept a secret as it’s public money and raised concerns that some school leaders were ‘trousering sizeable pay rises’ while colleagues were being made redundant.

This was backed up by Chris Keates, general secretary of the NASUWT, who added: “School leaders have highly responsible and important jobs and their salary should reflect this.

“But the combination of increased autonomy for schools and weak governance is failing to provide the appropriate regulation and scrutiny to ensure that head teachers’ salaries are determined in an open, fair and transparent manner.

"The opportunity for abuse is significant.”

Warrington South MP David Mowat added: “As a basic principle, I think that salaries funded by the taxpayer should be open to scrutiny by taxpayers – particularly for those on the highest salaries.”

How does the pay compare to other professions
Prime Minister
£142,500
Member of Parliament
£67,060
Specialist doctor
£37,176 - £69,325
NHS Consultant
£75,249 - £101,451
Qualified nurse
21,388 - 27,901
Cheshire's Police and Crime Commissioner
£75,000
Police constable
£22,221 to £36,885
Firefighter (competent)
£28,766
Station manager in Fire Service
£37,096
Secondary school teacher
£21,804 - £31,868
Council leader Warrington
£27,926.04

 

 

Comments (5)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

8:09am Fri 9 May 14

mustang1974 says...

Except for highlighting a public sector workers salary, I really don't see the point of this story whatsoever, it's barely that.

By highlighting other public sector workers salary in an attempt to rile the reader is a rather amateurish and ill-educated attempt to belittle a headteachers role.

One may argue that the emergency services deserve more pay for the amazing work they do on a daily basis, and I would agree, but by wanting an increase in pay in other sectors should not be a case for bemoaning other public sector workers pay.

'Good, honest, hard-working' head teachers who embrace integrity towards all staff, pupils/students, parents & community should be rewarded with pay that reflects this. In my opinion, most head teachers that I have come across fit this bill and deserve every penny they get.........their final salary, golden handshake pension, well, that's another story and issue altogether!!!!!
Except for highlighting a public sector workers salary, I really don't see the point of this story whatsoever, it's barely that. By highlighting other public sector workers salary in an attempt to rile the reader is a rather amateurish and ill-educated attempt to belittle a headteachers role. One may argue that the emergency services deserve more pay for the amazing work they do on a daily basis, and I would agree, but by wanting an increase in pay in other sectors should not be a case for bemoaning other public sector workers pay. 'Good, honest, hard-working' head teachers who embrace integrity towards all staff, pupils/students, parents & community should be rewarded with pay that reflects this. In my opinion, most head teachers that I have come across fit this bill and deserve every penny they get.........their final salary, golden handshake pension, well, that's another story and issue altogether!!!!! mustang1974
  • Score: 10

8:17am Fri 9 May 14

Nick Tessla says...

So most headteachers earn less than the Police Commissioner in his pretend job.
So most headteachers earn less than the Police Commissioner in his pretend job. Nick Tessla
  • Score: 4

8:49am Fri 9 May 14

Daz@SankeyviaOrford says...

Nick Tessla wrote:
So most headteachers earn less than the Police Commissioner in his pretend job.
Yes that just about sums it up nick. I think the earnings are fair if they are doing a good job. WG are just trying to s**t stir of the back of recent reporting.
[quote][p][bold]Nick Tessla[/bold] wrote: So most headteachers earn less than the Police Commissioner in his pretend job.[/p][/quote]Yes that just about sums it up nick. I think the earnings are fair if they are doing a good job. WG are just trying to s**t stir of the back of recent reporting. Daz@SankeyviaOrford
  • Score: 4

12:27pm Fri 9 May 14

Uncoded says...

There is no reference as to where they are getting these figures from.
I notice Warrington Guardian reporters salary isn't quoted. I genuinely hope they don't get paid. They constantly churn out pointless, very poorly written pieces.
There is no reference as to where they are getting these figures from. I notice Warrington Guardian reporters salary isn't quoted. I genuinely hope they don't get paid. They constantly churn out pointless, very poorly written pieces. Uncoded
  • Score: 3

1:12pm Fri 9 May 14

Redhillwire says...

Not quite sure what point you are trying to make here.

Half the jobs you are comparing aren't graduate jobs, whereas teaching is. In many cases a post grad qualification is expected. You are also comparing a job in which a person is responsible for leading perhaps 150-200 staff and controlling a budget of several million pounds. Not to mention the responsibility for on average, about 1200 children.

You also fail to mention the clinical excellence wards available to NHS consultants. this could push their pay as high as £175,000.

Perhaps, if you feel you have to compare headteachers' salaries, you should look at other graduate roles with responsibility for a significant number of staff.

Or perhaps you could simply not bother stirring up trouble.
Not quite sure what point you are trying to make here. Half the jobs you are comparing aren't graduate jobs, whereas teaching is. In many cases a post grad qualification is expected. You are also comparing a job in which a person is responsible for leading perhaps 150-200 staff and controlling a budget of several million pounds. Not to mention the responsibility for on average, about 1200 children. You also fail to mention the clinical excellence wards available to NHS consultants. this could push their pay as high as £175,000. Perhaps, if you feel you have to compare headteachers' salaries, you should look at other graduate roles with responsibility for a significant number of staff. Or perhaps you could simply not bother stirring up trouble. Redhillwire
  • Score: 9

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree