Ambulances have waited 20 minutes to drop off patients at Warrington Hospital

Warrington Guardian: Warrington Hospital Warrington Hospital

MORE than 1,600 people arriving in ambulances at Warrington Hospital have been sat waiting to be admitted for 20 minutes or more in the last 18 months.

A Warrington Guardian Freedom of Information request to the North West Ambulance Service (NWAS) found a total of 1,668 patients had to wait longer than the recommended target between April 2012 and October 2013.

Monthly figures show an improvement since changes to the town’s A&E were made following a cash injection in 2012.

But as hundreds of handover times are deemed ‘immeasurable’ by NWAS each month, the real figure for the number of patients waiting with paramedics to be handed over to hospital staff could be much higher.

Derek Cartwright, director of operations for NWAS, said: “NWAS works closely with commissioners, and all receiving hospitals across the region, to ensure that turnaround times are kept to the absolute minimum.

“NWAS has ambulance liaison officers who support and work closely with NWAS crews and A&E staff in hospitals to effectively manage and help improve ambulance turnaround times and patient flow within emergency departments.”

Simon Wright, chief operating officer of Warrington and Halton Hospitals, added the hospital’s ambulance turnaround times are ‘one of the best within the region’.

He added: “We work closely in partnership with North West Ambulance Service and have jointly funded a triage model where patients coming in via ambulance are received, assessed and handed over within a timely manner even during the busiest times.

“When we invested in the changes to our A&E unit last year we also developed a five bedded triage area.

“This helps ensure the dignity of patients being handed over via ambulance so that handovers to our team don’t take place in public areas or corridors.”

Comments (6)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

8:54am Thu 30 Jan 14

Nick Tessla says...

As I understand it, as long as a patient is on an ambulance the clock doesn't start running for how long their waiting time at the hospital.

Leaving a patient on the ambulance can therefore increase a hospitals' performance figures. It has been alleged that this has been deliberate practice at some hospitals.

I know that a spokesperson for Warrington Hospital has posted on here previously - perhaps they would care to comment on this.
As I understand it, as long as a patient is on an ambulance the clock doesn't start running for how long their waiting time at the hospital. Leaving a patient on the ambulance can therefore increase a hospitals' performance figures. It has been alleged that this has been deliberate practice at some hospitals. I know that a spokesperson for Warrington Hospital has posted on here previously - perhaps they would care to comment on this. Nick Tessla

10:53am Thu 30 Jan 14

The Maestro says...

But the ambulance service has their own clock so where a and e is ok ambulance will be different
But the ambulance service has their own clock so where a and e is ok ambulance will be different The Maestro

10:55am Thu 30 Jan 14

The Maestro says...

What I would like to know is what causes the delay? How many people go by ambulance who don't need to but clogg the system up etc?
What I would like to know is what causes the delay? How many people go by ambulance who don't need to but clogg the system up etc? The Maestro

12:12pm Thu 30 Jan 14

Nick Tessla says...

The Maestro wrote:
What I would like to know is what causes the delay? How many people go by ambulance who don't need to but clogg the system up etc?
Please don't go to the default position of blaming ill people.

If any use ambulances unnecessary then it is more likely the fault of the NHS helpline system.
[quote][p][bold]The Maestro[/bold] wrote: What I would like to know is what causes the delay? How many people go by ambulance who don't need to but clogg the system up etc?[/p][/quote]Please don't go to the default position of blaming ill people. If any use ambulances unnecessary then it is more likely the fault of the NHS helpline system. Nick Tessla

4:11pm Thu 30 Jan 14

The Maestro says...

Nick Tessla wrote:
The Maestro wrote:
What I would like to know is what causes the delay? How many people go by ambulance who don't need to but clogg the system up etc?
Please don't go to the default position of blaming ill people.

If any use ambulances unnecessary then it is more likely the fault of the NHS helpline system.
I don't remember blaming the ill. If someone who calls an ambulance wants to go hospital the ambulance staff cannot refuse, blocking an ambulance for a person who needs the service more.
[quote][p][bold]Nick Tessla[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Maestro[/bold] wrote: What I would like to know is what causes the delay? How many people go by ambulance who don't need to but clogg the system up etc?[/p][/quote]Please don't go to the default position of blaming ill people. If any use ambulances unnecessary then it is more likely the fault of the NHS helpline system.[/p][/quote]I don't remember blaming the ill. If someone who calls an ambulance wants to go hospital the ambulance staff cannot refuse, blocking an ambulance for a person who needs the service more. The Maestro

3:35pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Rowdie says...

The Maestro wrote:
Nick Tessla wrote:
The Maestro wrote:
What I would like to know is what causes the delay? How many people go by ambulance who don't need to but clogg the system up etc?
Please don't go to the default position of blaming ill people.

If any use ambulances unnecessary then it is more likely the fault of the NHS helpline system.
I don't remember blaming the ill. If someone who calls an ambulance wants to go hospital the ambulance staff cannot refuse, blocking an ambulance for a person who needs the service more.
Yes the question needs to be asked and addressed to why are we having 'waiting times'.Might it be something to do with the fact that it is mainly people
in the 20s who are attending than any other age group. Why? More than double the number of pensioners for instance when you would think that it would be the latter who would be most frequent users. The reasons given include..sports injuries, pregnancy-related problems, car accidents,difficulty getting a GP appointment and alcohol-related injuries.
It is very obvious this is an area where the powers that be need to focus on.
[quote][p][bold]The Maestro[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Nick Tessla[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Maestro[/bold] wrote: What I would like to know is what causes the delay? How many people go by ambulance who don't need to but clogg the system up etc?[/p][/quote]Please don't go to the default position of blaming ill people. If any use ambulances unnecessary then it is more likely the fault of the NHS helpline system.[/p][/quote]I don't remember blaming the ill. If someone who calls an ambulance wants to go hospital the ambulance staff cannot refuse, blocking an ambulance for a person who needs the service more.[/p][/quote]Yes the question needs to be asked and addressed to why are we having 'waiting times'.Might it be something to do with the fact that it is mainly people in the 20s who are attending than any other age group. Why? More than double the number of pensioners for instance when you would think that it would be the latter who would be most frequent users. The reasons given include..sports injuries, pregnancy-related problems, car accidents,difficulty getting a GP appointment and alcohol-related injuries. It is very obvious this is an area where the powers that be need to focus on. Rowdie

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree