HMP Risley 'not fit for purpose'

Warrington Guardian: HMP Risley 'not fit for purpose' HMP Risley 'not fit for purpose'

HMP Risley has been heavily criticised in a new report by a prison watchdog.

Prisoners are being kept in cells for 22 hours, violent behaviour and drug activity are on the up and some facilities are not fit for purpose, according to the Independent Monitoring Board’s latest report.

A spokesman said: “The continued requirement to make savings is having an adverse effect upon staff and prisoners, resulting in more violence (prisoner on prisoner and prisoner on staff).

“This is unacceptable and more resources should be given to ensure that prisoners are not left in cells for extended periods.

“In spite of the efforts of staff to maintain the normal regime, a reduction in the level of overtime covering for staff absences is resulting in the deterioration of some aspects of prison life.”

The prison, on Warrington Road, houses 1085 male prisoners in seven wings, two of which house the most dangerous offenders.

There are currently 98 lifers and 219 sex offenders held there, along with 172 foreign nationals.

Inspectors say useful activity for prisoners remains ‘too low’ with workshops operating at 10 per cent of capacity.

It means prisoners, mainly those who cannot work, are spending 22 hours a day locked down.

There is an ‘ever increasing’ problem with drugs and mobile phones in the prison, say inspectors, while the B wing is not fit for purpose.

Showers do not work, there are cockroaches and rooms are cramped.

The spokesman said: “It is the state of the facilities and equipment which concern the board most.

“Although the minister is well aware of the problem he has not seen fit to address it.”

Budget cuts of 20 per cent have also meant that the number of drug dogs and handlers have been reduced, with security staff ‘overstretched’.

And the report also says that 24 prisoners have been detained beyond their sentences, some because they are unable to obtain travel documents from relevant embassies.

One prisoner is 23 months over sentence.

Comments (27)

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5:00pm Wed 7 Nov 12

Cheap Mower says...

prisoners left in cells, showers not working and cockroaches everywhere . . . . . i don't see what the problem is, exactly how it should be
prisoners left in cells, showers not working and cockroaches everywhere . . . . . i don't see what the problem is, exactly how it should be Cheap Mower

7:42pm Wed 7 Nov 12

wires4ever says...

Being in their cell for 22 hours a day is how it should be! There is prison not on holiday!
Being in their cell for 22 hours a day is how it should be! There is prison not on holiday! wires4ever

8:26pm Wed 7 Nov 12

moleogod says...

seems fine today its there own fault if there in there. its the staff i feel sorry for just do up the staff areas that will do fine..
seems fine today its there own fault if there in there. its the staff i feel sorry for just do up the staff areas that will do fine.. moleogod

8:26pm Wed 7 Nov 12

moleogod says...

seems fine to me its there own fault if there in there. its the staff i feel sorry for just do up the staff areas that will do fine..
seems fine to me its there own fault if there in there. its the staff i feel sorry for just do up the staff areas that will do fine.. moleogod

10:21pm Wed 7 Nov 12

T1XYL1X says...

Glad to hear they a living in poorer conditions than usual. They are in prison not a 5*hotel. Our prison system should take lessons from those in foreign countries such as Peru, India etc...
Glad to hear they a living in poorer conditions than usual. They are in prison not a 5*hotel. Our prison system should take lessons from those in foreign countries such as Peru, India etc... T1XYL1X

8:59am Thu 8 Nov 12

MikeJT says...

"And the report also says that 24 prisoners have been detained beyond their sentences, some because they are unable to obtain travel documents from relevant embassies."

Is it just me or is anybody else thinking JUST DEPORT THEM. Afterall, if they obtained the correct documents and them were put on a plane, they would probably complain about the legroom and the food anyway.
"And the report also says that 24 prisoners have been detained beyond their sentences, some because they are unable to obtain travel documents from relevant embassies." Is it just me or is anybody else thinking JUST DEPORT THEM. Afterall, if they obtained the correct documents and them were put on a plane, they would probably complain about the legroom and the food anyway. MikeJT

9:46am Thu 8 Nov 12

Nick Tessla says...

One porpose of prison is rehabilitation - if the conditions at a prison prevent this happening then re-offending rates will be maintained or even increased - and, personally, I'd rather like crime rates to go down.
One porpose of prison is rehabilitation - if the conditions at a prison prevent this happening then re-offending rates will be maintained or even increased - and, personally, I'd rather like crime rates to go down. Nick Tessla

9:49am Thu 8 Nov 12

MrWhite says...

I don't see the problem? Personally I think the vile creature should be hung but hey ho.
I don't see the problem? Personally I think the vile creature should be hung but hey ho. MrWhite

9:58am Thu 8 Nov 12

beckyweller93 says...

why should it be wrong for them to stay in their sells i dont think its wrong!. a prison isnt a hotel they in there because they have commited a serious crime! its good their living that way! they criminals not the royals...
why should it be wrong for them to stay in their sells i dont think its wrong!. a prison isnt a hotel they in there because they have commited a serious crime! its good their living that way! they criminals not the royals... beckyweller93

10:09am Thu 8 Nov 12

MrWhite says...

I have to say for once I am happy to be commenting on a post where I am agreeing with people and vice versa, disgusting how thugs think they can do wrong and be treated nice and have a good standard of living, make an example and execute one, I bet the crime rate would drop rapidly! (and take the reoffending rates down)
I have to say for once I am happy to be commenting on a post where I am agreeing with people and vice versa, disgusting how thugs think they can do wrong and be treated nice and have a good standard of living, make an example and execute one, I bet the crime rate would drop rapidly! (and take the reoffending rates down) MrWhite

2:24pm Thu 8 Nov 12

LJ says...

Its pretty unanimous this one, isn't it?
Its pretty unanimous this one, isn't it? LJ

3:02pm Thu 8 Nov 12

Nick Tessla says...

LJ wrote:
Its pretty unanimous this one, isn't it?
No


People need to engage the rational part of their brain - rather than just their primitive instincts. If you want people to go to prison for a certain period and come out with a high chance that they will commit further offences then fine. If, however, you want the prison system to have any chance of rehabilitating the offenders and reducing the crime rate, then you must acceot that providing a regime to achieve that is neccesary.

Personally I would like to see re-offending go down.


Retreating into an infantile fantasy where the solution is to lock every offender up in awful conditions, for the rest of their life regardless of the nature of the offence, and to hang a few to discourage the others is not the solution. It also, quite frankly, displays some of the, socially immature, mindsets of some of those with criminal / violent tendencies - including a tendency to thrash out irrationally, whether verbally or physically, at an actual or perceived wrong word or action.
[quote][p][bold]LJ[/bold] wrote: Its pretty unanimous this one, isn't it?[/p][/quote]No People need to engage the rational part of their brain - rather than just their primitive instincts. If you want people to go to prison for a certain period and come out with a high chance that they will commit further offences then fine. If, however, you want the prison system to have any chance of rehabilitating the offenders and reducing the crime rate, then you must acceot that providing a regime to achieve that is neccesary. Personally I would like to see re-offending go down. Retreating into an infantile fantasy where the solution is to lock every offender up in awful conditions, for the rest of their life regardless of the nature of the offence, and to hang a few to discourage the others is not the solution. It also, quite frankly, displays some of the, socially immature, mindsets of some of those with criminal / violent tendencies - including a tendency to thrash out irrationally, whether verbally or physically, at an actual or perceived wrong word or action. Nick Tessla

3:18pm Thu 8 Nov 12

LJ says...

Well Nick, personally I'm just happy to see criminals off the streets, giving their victims a break. If prisons were miserable places to be locked up, the average person would think twice before doing something stupid again. Those who don't think twice are obviously slow learners and may have to be locked up a few times before it sinks in. We've thrown enough money at rehabilitation and its not changed anything. If we have any money to throw around, we should be using it to build more prisons - cheap prisons; it would create construction jobs, boosting the economy, act as a deterent, and do away with soft sentencing, rather than wasting money on lost causes
Well Nick, personally I'm just happy to see criminals off the streets, giving their victims a break. If prisons were miserable places to be locked up, the average person would think twice before doing something stupid again. Those who don't think twice are obviously slow learners and may have to be locked up a few times before it sinks in. We've thrown enough money at rehabilitation and its not changed anything. If we have any money to throw around, we should be using it to build more prisons - cheap prisons; it would create construction jobs, boosting the economy, act as a deterent, and do away with soft sentencing, rather than wasting money on lost causes LJ

6:52pm Thu 8 Nov 12

MickyMuddle says...

They should lock them up 24 hours a day not 22 for me.

So what if its damp, the showers don't work and there are cockroaches ! Let them suffer
They should lock them up 24 hours a day not 22 for me. So what if its damp, the showers don't work and there are cockroaches ! Let them suffer MickyMuddle

6:55pm Thu 8 Nov 12

MickyMuddle says...

Nick Tessla wrote:
LJ wrote:
Its pretty unanimous this one, isn't it?
No


People need to engage the rational part of their brain - rather than just their primitive instincts. If you want people to go to prison for a certain period and come out with a high chance that they will commit further offences then fine. If, however, you want the prison system to have any chance of rehabilitating the offenders and reducing the crime rate, then you must acceot that providing a regime to achieve that is neccesary.

Personally I would like to see re-offending go down.


Retreating into an infantile fantasy where the solution is to lock every offender up in awful conditions, for the rest of their life regardless of the nature of the offence, and to hang a few to discourage the others is not the solution. It also, quite frankly, displays some of the, socially immature, mindsets of some of those with criminal / violent tendencies - including a tendency to thrash out irrationally, whether verbally or physically, at an actual or perceived wrong word or action.
Ok then how about we put them through a rehabilitation course (where they'd just say what they think the staff want to hear) then lets release them to live next door to you !!!

Still keen on what you've suggested?
[quote][p][bold]Nick Tessla[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LJ[/bold] wrote: Its pretty unanimous this one, isn't it?[/p][/quote]No People need to engage the rational part of their brain - rather than just their primitive instincts. If you want people to go to prison for a certain period and come out with a high chance that they will commit further offences then fine. If, however, you want the prison system to have any chance of rehabilitating the offenders and reducing the crime rate, then you must acceot that providing a regime to achieve that is neccesary. Personally I would like to see re-offending go down. Retreating into an infantile fantasy where the solution is to lock every offender up in awful conditions, for the rest of their life regardless of the nature of the offence, and to hang a few to discourage the others is not the solution. It also, quite frankly, displays some of the, socially immature, mindsets of some of those with criminal / violent tendencies - including a tendency to thrash out irrationally, whether verbally or physically, at an actual or perceived wrong word or action.[/p][/quote]Ok then how about we put them through a rehabilitation course (where they'd just say what they think the staff want to hear) then lets release them to live next door to you !!! Still keen on what you've suggested? MickyMuddle

7:23pm Thu 8 Nov 12

SickAndTired2 says...

As always, the Victorian small minded sadistic attitudes are out in force on these stories..

So what is wrong with locking them up for 22 hours? Well they cost approximately £120,000 to be placed in prison and an extra £48,000 a year to be kept there.

But I guess for the knuckledraggers on these pages, it is justifiable a justifiable cost for a prisoner to be locked up for 22 hours a day in a drug riddled prison before being released back into society, likely damaged by the experience and more likely to commit more serious offences upon their return to freedom.

Prison should be as much about reform as it is punishment, if prisoners were put to positive work to do good for local communities which they then surely everyone benefits? If it costs so much to lock them up, then at least their time should be spent in productive work.

How on Earth do you expect someone to reintegrate back into society after being locked up in such squalid conditions?

I'm embarrassed to even be of the same species as some of the vile inhumane and brain dead creatures who air their sadistic opinions on here, let alone to be from the same town.
As always, the Victorian small minded sadistic attitudes are out in force on these stories.. So what is wrong with locking them up for 22 hours? Well they cost approximately £120,000 to be placed in prison and an extra £48,000 a year to be kept there. But I guess for the knuckledraggers on these pages, it is justifiable a justifiable cost for a prisoner to be locked up for 22 hours a day in a drug riddled prison before being released back into society, likely damaged by the experience and more likely to commit more serious offences upon their return to freedom. Prison should be as much about reform as it is punishment, if prisoners were put to positive work to do good for local communities which they then surely everyone benefits? If it costs so much to lock them up, then at least their time should be spent in productive work. How on Earth do you expect someone to reintegrate back into society after being locked up in such squalid conditions? I'm embarrassed to even be of the same species as some of the vile inhumane and brain dead creatures who air their sadistic opinions on here, let alone to be from the same town. SickAndTired2

8:02pm Thu 8 Nov 12

MickyMuddle says...

SickAndTired2 wrote:
As always, the Victorian small minded sadistic attitudes are out in force on these stories..

So what is wrong with locking them up for 22 hours? Well they cost approximately £120,000 to be placed in prison and an extra £48,000 a year to be kept there.

But I guess for the knuckledraggers on these pages, it is justifiable a justifiable cost for a prisoner to be locked up for 22 hours a day in a drug riddled prison before being released back into society, likely damaged by the experience and more likely to commit more serious offences upon their return to freedom.

Prison should be as much about reform as it is punishment, if prisoners were put to positive work to do good for local communities which they then surely everyone benefits? If it costs so much to lock them up, then at least their time should be spent in productive work.

How on Earth do you expect someone to reintegrate back into society after being locked up in such squalid conditions?

I'm embarrassed to even be of the same species as some of the vile inhumane and brain dead creatures who air their sadistic opinions on here, let alone to be from the same town.
Typical Liberal resorting to petty name calling when someone doesn't share your opinion, if that's all you're capable of id take a long look in the mirror before you call anyone else a 'knuckle dragger'

You do realise that prison is supposed to be a punishment and a deterrent don't you? And more importantly how would you feel if you found out a violent prisoner who had been released early after being put through some 'softly softly' rehab course was moving in next door to you?
[quote][p][bold]SickAndTired2[/bold] wrote: As always, the Victorian small minded sadistic attitudes are out in force on these stories.. So what is wrong with locking them up for 22 hours? Well they cost approximately £120,000 to be placed in prison and an extra £48,000 a year to be kept there. But I guess for the knuckledraggers on these pages, it is justifiable a justifiable cost for a prisoner to be locked up for 22 hours a day in a drug riddled prison before being released back into society, likely damaged by the experience and more likely to commit more serious offences upon their return to freedom. Prison should be as much about reform as it is punishment, if prisoners were put to positive work to do good for local communities which they then surely everyone benefits? If it costs so much to lock them up, then at least their time should be spent in productive work. How on Earth do you expect someone to reintegrate back into society after being locked up in such squalid conditions? I'm embarrassed to even be of the same species as some of the vile inhumane and brain dead creatures who air their sadistic opinions on here, let alone to be from the same town.[/p][/quote]Typical Liberal resorting to petty name calling when someone doesn't share your opinion, if that's all you're capable of id take a long look in the mirror before you call anyone else a 'knuckle dragger' You do realise that prison is supposed to be a punishment and a deterrent don't you? And more importantly how would you feel if you found out a violent prisoner who had been released early after being put through some 'softly softly' rehab course was moving in next door to you? MickyMuddle

9:03pm Thu 8 Nov 12

Nick Tessla says...

MickyMuddle wrote:
SickAndTired2 wrote: As always, the Victorian small minded sadistic attitudes are out in force on these stories.. So what is wrong with locking them up for 22 hours? Well they cost approximately £120,000 to be placed in prison and an extra £48,000 a year to be kept there. But I guess for the knuckledraggers on these pages, it is justifiable a justifiable cost for a prisoner to be locked up for 22 hours a day in a drug riddled prison before being released back into society, likely damaged by the experience and more likely to commit more serious offences upon their return to freedom. Prison should be as much about reform as it is punishment, if prisoners were put to positive work to do good for local communities which they then surely everyone benefits? If it costs so much to lock them up, then at least their time should be spent in productive work. How on Earth do you expect someone to reintegrate back into society after being locked up in such squalid conditions? I'm embarrassed to even be of the same species as some of the vile inhumane and brain dead creatures who air their sadistic opinions on here, let alone to be from the same town.
Typical Liberal resorting to petty name calling when someone doesn't share your opinion, if that's all you're capable of id take a long look in the mirror before you call anyone else a 'knuckle dragger' You do realise that prison is supposed to be a punishment and a deterrent don't you? And more importantly how would you feel if you found out a violent prisoner who had been released early after being put through some 'softly softly' rehab course was moving in next door to you?
Prison is for punishment, deterrant AND rehabilitation.
[quote][p][bold]MickyMuddle[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SickAndTired2[/bold] wrote: As always, the Victorian small minded sadistic attitudes are out in force on these stories.. So what is wrong with locking them up for 22 hours? Well they cost approximately £120,000 to be placed in prison and an extra £48,000 a year to be kept there. But I guess for the knuckledraggers on these pages, it is justifiable a justifiable cost for a prisoner to be locked up for 22 hours a day in a drug riddled prison before being released back into society, likely damaged by the experience and more likely to commit more serious offences upon their return to freedom. Prison should be as much about reform as it is punishment, if prisoners were put to positive work to do good for local communities which they then surely everyone benefits? If it costs so much to lock them up, then at least their time should be spent in productive work. How on Earth do you expect someone to reintegrate back into society after being locked up in such squalid conditions? I'm embarrassed to even be of the same species as some of the vile inhumane and brain dead creatures who air their sadistic opinions on here, let alone to be from the same town.[/p][/quote]Typical Liberal resorting to petty name calling when someone doesn't share your opinion, if that's all you're capable of id take a long look in the mirror before you call anyone else a 'knuckle dragger' You do realise that prison is supposed to be a punishment and a deterrent don't you? And more importantly how would you feel if you found out a violent prisoner who had been released early after being put through some 'softly softly' rehab course was moving in next door to you?[/p][/quote]Prison is for punishment, deterrant AND rehabilitation. Nick Tessla

9:07pm Thu 8 Nov 12

Nick Tessla says...

MickyMuddle wrote:
Nick Tessla wrote:
LJ wrote: Its pretty unanimous this one, isn't it?
No People need to engage the rational part of their brain - rather than just their primitive instincts. If you want people to go to prison for a certain period and come out with a high chance that they will commit further offences then fine. If, however, you want the prison system to have any chance of rehabilitating the offenders and reducing the crime rate, then you must acceot that providing a regime to achieve that is neccesary. Personally I would like to see re-offending go down. Retreating into an infantile fantasy where the solution is to lock every offender up in awful conditions, for the rest of their life regardless of the nature of the offence, and to hang a few to discourage the others is not the solution. It also, quite frankly, displays some of the, socially immature, mindsets of some of those with criminal / violent tendencies - including a tendency to thrash out irrationally, whether verbally or physically, at an actual or perceived wrong word or action.
Ok then how about we put them through a rehabilitation course (where they'd just say what they think the staff want to hear) then lets release them to live next door to you !!! Still keen on what you've suggested?
They have to live somwhere , so if it happened to be next door to me then I'd rather they had been through a PROPER programme of rehabilitation and re-integration thjat reduced their chances of re-offending - wouldn't you?
[quote][p][bold]MickyMuddle[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Nick Tessla[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LJ[/bold] wrote: Its pretty unanimous this one, isn't it?[/p][/quote]No People need to engage the rational part of their brain - rather than just their primitive instincts. If you want people to go to prison for a certain period and come out with a high chance that they will commit further offences then fine. If, however, you want the prison system to have any chance of rehabilitating the offenders and reducing the crime rate, then you must acceot that providing a regime to achieve that is neccesary. Personally I would like to see re-offending go down. Retreating into an infantile fantasy where the solution is to lock every offender up in awful conditions, for the rest of their life regardless of the nature of the offence, and to hang a few to discourage the others is not the solution. It also, quite frankly, displays some of the, socially immature, mindsets of some of those with criminal / violent tendencies - including a tendency to thrash out irrationally, whether verbally or physically, at an actual or perceived wrong word or action.[/p][/quote]Ok then how about we put them through a rehabilitation course (where they'd just say what they think the staff want to hear) then lets release them to live next door to you !!! Still keen on what you've suggested?[/p][/quote]They have to live somwhere , so if it happened to be next door to me then I'd rather they had been through a PROPER programme of rehabilitation and re-integration thjat reduced their chances of re-offending - wouldn't you? Nick Tessla

4:44pm Fri 9 Nov 12

Paris says...

Send the 'foreign nationals' back to serve their sentences in their home country. At least this way the country won't have to re house them once they are released!
Send the 'foreign nationals' back to serve their sentences in their home country. At least this way the country won't have to re house them once they are released! Paris

4:44pm Fri 9 Nov 12

Paris says...

Send the 'foreign nationals' back to serve their sentences in their home country. At least this way the country won't have to re house them once they are released!
Send the 'foreign nationals' back to serve their sentences in their home country. At least this way the country won't have to re house them once they are released! Paris

11:31pm Fri 9 Nov 12

chumhill says...

Nick Tessla wrote:
LJ wrote:
Its pretty unanimous this one, isn't it?
No


People need to engage the rational part of their brain - rather than just their primitive instincts. If you want people to go to prison for a certain period and come out with a high chance that they will commit further offences then fine. If, however, you want the prison system to have any chance of rehabilitating the offenders and reducing the crime rate, then you must acceot that providing a regime to achieve that is neccesary.

Personally I would like to see re-offending go down.


Retreating into an infantile fantasy where the solution is to lock every offender up in awful conditions, for the rest of their life regardless of the nature of the offence, and to hang a few to discourage the others is not the solution. It also, quite frankly, displays some of the, socially immature, mindsets of some of those with criminal / violent tendencies - including a tendency to thrash out irrationally, whether verbally or physically, at an actual or perceived wrong word or action.
What a complete crock of **** its people with thoughts like this that have got us in a position where prisoners have xbox games consoles, tv's better standard of living that most elderly people on a pension. Prisons have improved over the years and more and more options for rehabilitation but still crime rates go up and prisons become more over crowded. This simply isnt working. Prisons should be very rough and really nasty places to be. Its human natre to avoid situations where you feel threatened or uncomfortable. Yeah it wouldnt solve all problems as criminals become more reckless to avoind being caught but thats the minority, overall crime rates would drop as people wouldnt want to be in prison. At this moment in time people dont mind because they are looked after far too much. Watchdogs like this make me sick, go and use your time for better purposes and go and investigate bad schools, bad nursing homes, look after decent law abiding people not somthing ive stepped in!
[quote][p][bold]Nick Tessla[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LJ[/bold] wrote: Its pretty unanimous this one, isn't it?[/p][/quote]No People need to engage the rational part of their brain - rather than just their primitive instincts. If you want people to go to prison for a certain period and come out with a high chance that they will commit further offences then fine. If, however, you want the prison system to have any chance of rehabilitating the offenders and reducing the crime rate, then you must acceot that providing a regime to achieve that is neccesary. Personally I would like to see re-offending go down. Retreating into an infantile fantasy where the solution is to lock every offender up in awful conditions, for the rest of their life regardless of the nature of the offence, and to hang a few to discourage the others is not the solution. It also, quite frankly, displays some of the, socially immature, mindsets of some of those with criminal / violent tendencies - including a tendency to thrash out irrationally, whether verbally or physically, at an actual or perceived wrong word or action.[/p][/quote]What a complete crock of **** its people with thoughts like this that have got us in a position where prisoners have xbox games consoles, tv's better standard of living that most elderly people on a pension. Prisons have improved over the years and more and more options for rehabilitation but still crime rates go up and prisons become more over crowded. This simply isnt working. Prisons should be very rough and really nasty places to be. Its human natre to avoid situations where you feel threatened or uncomfortable. Yeah it wouldnt solve all problems as criminals become more reckless to avoind being caught but thats the minority, overall crime rates would drop as people wouldnt want to be in prison. At this moment in time people dont mind because they are looked after far too much. Watchdogs like this make me sick, go and use your time for better purposes and go and investigate bad schools, bad nursing homes, look after decent law abiding people not somthing ive stepped in! chumhill

5:41pm Sat 10 Nov 12

djh1988 says...

there are loads of people in prison who have made mistakes. Young lads who got into fights. Old men who are nothing more than drunks and many vunerable people who cant cope out of prison. All you idiots who think that making prison as hard and horrible as possible does any good at all need to pull your head out of your arses. Hope one day you make a mistake and end up crying yourself to sleep in a cockroach infested cell.
there are loads of people in prison who have made mistakes. Young lads who got into fights. Old men who are nothing more than drunks and many vunerable people who cant cope out of prison. All you idiots who think that making prison as hard and horrible as possible does any good at all need to pull your head out of your arses. Hope one day you make a mistake and end up crying yourself to sleep in a cockroach infested cell. djh1988

9:48am Sun 11 Nov 12

Nick Tessla says...

Not to mention the high number of ex service personnel who end up in trouble with the law.
Not to mention the high number of ex service personnel who end up in trouble with the law. Nick Tessla

12:47pm Sun 11 Nov 12

chumhill says...

djh1988 wrote:
there are loads of people in prison who have made mistakes. Young lads who got into fights. Old men who are nothing more than drunks and many vunerable people who cant cope out of prison. All you idiots who think that making prison as hard and horrible as possible does any good at all need to pull your head out of your arses. Hope one day you make a mistake and end up crying yourself to sleep in a cockroach infested cell.
Think you need a reality check, if i got into a fight, caused a public disturbance etc and ended up in jail and it was really bad i sure as hell would think twice about going back in and getting into fights etc.
[quote][p][bold]djh1988[/bold] wrote: there are loads of people in prison who have made mistakes. Young lads who got into fights. Old men who are nothing more than drunks and many vunerable people who cant cope out of prison. All you idiots who think that making prison as hard and horrible as possible does any good at all need to pull your head out of your arses. Hope one day you make a mistake and end up crying yourself to sleep in a cockroach infested cell.[/p][/quote]Think you need a reality check, if i got into a fight, caused a public disturbance etc and ended up in jail and it was really bad i sure as hell would think twice about going back in and getting into fights etc. chumhill

2:27pm Tue 13 Nov 12

Turnaround says...

As well as the types of people that djh1988 has mentioned who else finds it good having their freedom taken from them? That has got to be a deterrent and put people off re-offending? For me, this is why drug usage is rife. Users feel that they can cope with being imprisoned no matter how 'luxurious' their surrounding. They are not able to nip to the pub / shop / town etc - is this not enough?
As well as the types of people that djh1988 has mentioned who else finds it good having their freedom taken from them? That has got to be a deterrent and put people off re-offending? For me, this is why drug usage is rife. Users feel that they can cope with being imprisoned no matter how 'luxurious' their surrounding. They are not able to nip to the pub / shop / town etc - is this not enough? Turnaround

12:43pm Tue 20 Nov 12

jitterbug says...

Maybe if prisons over here were a little more like the 'Bangkok Hilton' then people would think twice about re-offending upon release.

This country is too soft
Maybe if prisons over here were a little more like the 'Bangkok Hilton' then people would think twice about re-offending upon release. This country is too soft jitterbug

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